Last weekend the squad made big improvements in the light conditions on day one, testing those skills in the morning of day two, and finishing it off with some nice planing conditions. This debrief will focus on those light air lessons, and what we’d like to see you solidify before the next training camp!

Flattens

Across maneuvers and across conditions, one of the most important aspects of good boat handling is the flatten. Teams that are the best at boat handling have the best flattens. If you can master the flatten in light, medium, and heavy air then you will have a huge part of your boat handling locked in. Flattens generate all the power for you boat handling and they are the single most important move to generate speed. We talked a lot about the goals of a flatten and how to do them, but simply knowing this will not be enough. I urge all of you to spend as much time as you can focusing on perfecting your flattens. The difference between a good one and a bad one is monumental. When teams had bad flattens this weekend they were rushed, unbalanced, aggressive, and jerky. When you were able to have a long, smooth, balanced, powerful flatten, your boats shot forward and the maneuver was very good. I hope you all felt this difference at one point or another. I’m going to link two clips from my videos. One is of a bad flatten (click here), and one is of a very good flatten (click here). Your job is to identify the differences and make a list for your team of improvements you can make to have a better flatten.

Check out the playlist from the weekend here to compare your own technique.

The Bell Curve Flatten

Remember the discussion we had about cavitation on the foils? Below are two videos of a paddle slapping the water. In the first, the boat is moving forward, and you can see water fill back in around the paddle. In the second, the boat is stationary, and a big hole appears in the water. In both cases here, the paddle ventilates, but that’s because we’re swinging the paddle at the water HARD, and not moving very fast. Hopefully with the way the water fills back in around the paddle in the moving boat video, you can imagine how flow stays attached more easily at higher speeds. This is why our rate of flatten actually needs to increase as the boat accelerates.

Slow down

One of the easiest ways to improve your boat handling is to be patient and take it slowly. You can practice doing tacks and gybes at half, or quarter speed. You may find that slowing everything down actually makes your average boat speed faster. Going slower means that you will find it easier to get in sync and stay in sync with your partner. You will also have a slower rate of turn, which means less rudder movement to slow your boat speed. Flattening slower is a good way to practice being smooth. A really helpful drill is the entry-exit drill. Start a 1 minute timer, and each time it goes off practice just the entry to your maneuver. Stop in the middle and then practice an exit to get back up to speed. Once you have isolated and mastered each piece of the maneuver you will be able to add all the pieces back together and do a perfect maneuver at a faster speed. At the least, you will know that you got better at one part of your maneuver.


Videos from the weekend can be found here.

The next event will be at Mission Bay Yacht Club, May 4-5. For more information, click here.

Photos from the weekend can be found here. Please be sure to tag @skiffsquad when you post!